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Robots won't replace us because we still need 'that human touch'

So says Australia's Chief Scientist Alan Finkel in a new piece for The Conversation.

Seamus Byrne
Seamus Byrne
1 min read
Robots won't replace us because we still need 'that human touch'

So says Australia's Chief Scientist Alan Finkel in a new piece for The Conversation.

This brings us back to an important focus area for parents and young folks trying to pin down a smart career path that won't be eaten up by machines in the coming 30 years. What are the tasks that really need a human touch?

But automation hasn’t killed the artisan bakery. Online courses haven’t killed the bricks-and-mortar university. FitBit hasn’t killed the personal trainer. On the contrary, they’re all booming, alongside their machine equivalents.

Some good perspectives on the concepts that make a job 'human', or attractive to human customers, not just general thematic or industry discussions.

[Image courtesy of Wes Mountain/The Conversation, CC BY-ND]

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Founder and Head of Content at Byteside.


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