I can admit it, I’m obsessed with TikTok at this point.

Hours spent scrolling have increased dramatically over the past year – for obvious reasons. But it hasn’t all been time wasted.

For one thing, I’ve been able to follow and gain inspiration from creators across all different styles and audience sizes and I’m constantly in awe of what is being posted on the daily.

One artist who has extended her music career beyond TikTok recently is Peach, signing a recording contract with Republic Records and having recently released her new single, 'Josh'.

(No, not that Princess. Though she and her friends have been a much needed personal respite during lockdown. )

Long admired by fans for her candid and relatable nature regarding her own mental health, Peach PRC has embraced this part of her life by uploading videos that help viewers carry out common household care tasks.

These errands are typically known to be simple or easy to complete, but for those acquainted with the lingering effects of mental illness this statement couldn’t be any further from the truth.

It’s often hard to explain why wiping benchtops or vacuuming the floor feel akin to pushing a boulder up a hill and it’s even harder to articulate why the idea of starting these chores feels out of reach all too often.

Luckily, there are many online spaces to provide solace and give people a gentle nudge of motivation in a way that isn’t too confronting. For me, that space has existed with Peach. Not only for how genuinely mindful her videos have been to watch, but also for the sense of comfort and safety you find through her conversations around mental health.

This is a huge reason I think Peach’s TikTok, presented in such a light-hearted and accessible way, is so important.

There is still a long way to go, but conversations around mental health have shifted monumentally over the years. Videos like these are increasingly being looked upon in less judgemental and shameful ways.

To date, Peach has uploaded two videos in this category, folding laundry and cleaning her bedroom whilst de-stigmatising the guilt that often accompanies the long term effects of mental illness. Both videos have run times of about an hour, giving viewers the opportunity to complete these tasks with her in real time.

The titles do specify that audiences with ADHD and depression are a core focus, though it’s safe to say that individuals with other mental health concerns could undoubtedly benefit as well.

I’m hoping Peach uploads a bathroom cleaning video in the near future. I’m yet to find a way to make that chore bearable!

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